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52nd MXG teams up with 435th CRS to get hot pit certified

U.S. Air Force maintainers from the 435th Contingency Response Squadron, from Ramsteim Air Base, Germany, work alongside 52nd Maintenance Group Airmen to practice hot pit refueling operations on the flightline at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, May 18, 2020. The 435th CRS support the mobility aircraft by trade but over the past 18 months have started certification to servicing operations on fighter jets as part of their preparation for Agile Combat Employment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Branden Rae)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Andrew Domingo, left, Senior Airman Tyler Sommerfield, middle, and Tech. Sgt Donovan Reid, right, 435th Contingency Response Squadron contingency response crew chiefs, from Ramsteim Air Base, Germany, inspect a fuel nozzle during hot pit refueling practice on the flightline at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, May 18, 2020. Hot pit refueling is the process in which ground crew Airmen refuel an aircraft while its engines are still running, allowing the aircraft the ability to get back into the air as quickly as possible. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Branden Rae)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Tyler Sommerfield,left, and Senior Airman Cortavious Stepney, right, 435th Contingency Response Squadron contingency response crew chiefs, from Ramsteim Air Base, Germany, signal each other while practicing hot pit refueling on the flightline at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, May 18, 2020. A hot pit is the refueling of an aircraft while its engine is still running. During the refueling process, the aircraft is checked for safety items such as leaks and debris before returning to the air. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Branden Rae)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Andrew Domingo, 435th Contingency Response Squadron contingency response crew chief, from Ramsteim Air Base, Germany, attaches fuel nozzle during a hot pit refueling at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, May 18, 2020. Hot pit refueling saves time, manpower and equipment usage by using a Type-4 hydrant system to refuel active aircraft between training missions. Refueling still-running aircraft requires fewer Airmen and no refueling trucks because only two 52nd Logistics Readiness Squadron fuels distribution Airmen are needed to operate the hydrant system. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Branden Rae)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Andrew Domingo, 435th Contingency Response Squadron contingency response crew chief, from Ramsteim Air Base, Germany, practices attaching a fuel nozzle to an F-16 Fighting Falcon on the flightline at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, May 18, 2020. Hot pits are a more efficient refueling method because the aircraft is refueled with its engines on, making the refill approximately 30% faster. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Branden Rae)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Cortavious Stepney, 435th Contingency Response Squadron contingency response crew chief, from Ramsteim Air Base, Germany, plugs in a ground wire during hot pit refueling on the flightline at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, May 18, 2020. An aircraft’s engine stays running during a hot pit allowing approximately 1,300 gallons of fuel to be administered 30% faster than a typical refueling process. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Branden Rae)

U.S. Air Force maintainers from the 435th Contingency Response Squadron, from Ramsteim Air Base, Germany, work alongside 52nd Maintenance Group Airmen to get certified on hot pit refueling operations on the flightline at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, May 18, 2020. Hot pit refueling is a procedure performed in a combat environment to rapidly refuel aircraft while the aircraft engines are running, resulting in speedy refueling and faster aircraft regeneration. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Branden Rae)

SPANGDAHLEM AIR BASE, Germany --