Radio technicians fix the frequency

A warning sign rests on the workbench of a radio maintenance bay at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, June 30, 2014. Technicians must use proper personal protective gear while performing maintenance to ensure the safety of themselves and the equipment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Gustavo Castillo/Released)

A warning sign rests on the workbench of a radio maintenance bay at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, June 30, 2014. Technicians must use proper personal protective gear while performing maintenance to ensure the safety of themselves and the equipment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Gustavo Castillo/Released)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Jaquan Stewart, 606th Air Control Squadron radio frequency transmission technician from Folkston, Ga., performs maintenance on a GRC-171 radio transceiver at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, June 30, 2014. Airmen must inspect equipment on a regular basis in order to maintain a deployable and mission-ready status to support real-world operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Gustavo Castillo/Released)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Jaquan Stewart, 606th Air Control Squadron radio frequency transmission technician from Folkston, Ga., performs maintenance on a GRC-171 radio transceiver at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, June 30, 2014. Airmen must inspect equipment on a regular basis in order to maintain a deployable and mission-ready status to support real-world operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Gustavo Castillo/Released)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Jaquan Stewart, 606th Air Control Squadron radio frequency transmission technician from Folkston, Ga., disassembles a GRC-171 radio transceiver at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, June 30, 2014. While inspecting the equipment, Airmen clear out any dust and debris, and search for any abnormalities that would endanger the equipment or operators. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Gustavo Castillo/Released)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Jaquan Stewart, 606th Air Control Squadron radio frequency transmission technician from Folkston, Ga., disassembles a GRC-171 radio transceiver at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, June 30, 2014. While inspecting the equipment, Airmen clear out any dust and debris, and search for any abnormalities that would endanger the equipment or operators. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Gustavo Castillo/Released)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Jaquan Stewart, 606th Air Control Squadron radio frequency transmission technician from Folkston, Ga., troubleshoots a GRC-171 radio transceiver at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, June 30, 2014. Stewart uses an electrostatic discharge mat while touching the equipment to ground himself and mitigate any risk of electrical damage to the radio. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Gustavo Castillo/Released)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Jaquan Stewart, 606th Air Control Squadron radio frequency transmission technician from Folkston, Ga., troubleshoots a GRC-171 radio transceiver at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, June 30, 2014. Stewart uses an electrostatic discharge mat while touching the equipment to ground himself and mitigate any risk of electrical damage to the radio. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Gustavo Castillo/Released)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Alex Lollar, 606th Air Control Squadron radio frequency transmission technician from Pensacola, Fla., assembles a GRC-171 radio transceiver at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, June 30, 2014. In working condition, the transceiver, designed for reliable air traffic control communications, can transmit a signal to aircraft approximately 250 nautical miles away. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Gustavo Castillo/Released)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Alex Lollar, 606th Air Control Squadron radio frequency transmission technician from Pensacola, Fla., assembles a GRC-171 radio transceiver at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, June 30, 2014. In working condition, the transceiver, designed for reliable air traffic control communications, can transmit a signal to aircraft approximately 250 nautical miles away. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Gustavo Castillo/Released)