HomeNewsArticle Display

Sabers conduct short-notice exercise

During the inspection, the team is allowed to search for all equipment subject to the treaty which includes F-16 Fighting Falcon aircraft.

Defense Threat Reduction Agency inspection team and a Conventional Forces in Europe inspection escort team, walk the flightline during a CFE treaty exercise at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, Oct. 4, 2018. During the inspection, the team is allowed to search for all equipment subject to the treaty which includes F-16 Fighting Falcon aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jovante Johnson)

This exercise was conducted in order to verify Spangdahlem's readiness to host a short-notice CFE inspection.

Defense Threat Reduction Agency members review guidelines of the Conventional Forces in Europe inspection treaty during a CFE exercise at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, Oct. 4, 2018. This exercise was conducted in order to verify Spangdahlem's readiness to host a short-notice CFE inspection. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jovante Johnson)

Spangdahlem AB is subject to a CFE inspection with as little as 43 hours advance notice.

Defense Threat Reduction Agency inspection team and a Conventional Forces in Europe inspection escort team, conduct a meeting about the guidelines of the CFE treaty exercise, at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, Oct. 4, 2018. Spangdahlem AB is subject to a CFE inspection with as little as 43 hours advance notice. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jovante Johnson)

DTRA members were playing the roles of a foreign inspection team during the exercise.

Defense Threat Reduction Agency inspection team member, left, photographs an F-16 Fighting Falcon tail number during a Conventional Forces in Europe exercise at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, Oct. 4, 2018. DTRA members were playing the roles of a foreign inspection team during the exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jovante Johnson)

Fast communication between multiple squadrons is a factor in making the CFE treaty inspection as easy and as fast as possible.

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Tyra James, 52nd Security Forces Squadron NCO in charge of physical security, waits for further instructions during a Conventional Armed Forces in Europe treaty exercise at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, Oct. 4, 2018. Fast communication between multiple squadrons is a factor in making the CFE treaty inspection as easy and as fast as possible. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jovante Johnson)

This documentation is used to prove that the 52nd Fighter Wing provided the necessary access to the F-16s, a part of the CFE treaty reporting requirements.

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Phillip Lindley, 52nd Maintenance squadron avionics intermediate shop production supervisor, documents building numbers visited and the times visited during a Conventional Armed Forces in Europe treaty exercise at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, Oct. 4, 2018. This documentation is used to prove that the 52nd Fighter Wing provided the necessary access to the F-16s, a part of the CFE treaty reporting requirements. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jovante Johnson)

SPANGDAHLEM AIR BASE, Germany --

Spangdahlem Air Base participated in a Conventional Armed Force in Europe treaty exercise on Spangdahlem AB, Oct. 4, 2018, in order to display short-notice CFE inspection readiness.

The CFE treaty is in place to track the number of combat aircraft, battle tanks, armored personnel carriers, combat helicopters, and artillery located within each State Party within the European Area of Application. This treaty is set in place to ensure that each State Party does not exceed the maximum number of items within that location, but there is no minimum. The F-16 Fighting Falcon aircraft located on Spangdahlem AB are among the inspection items, making the Wing susceptible to treaty reporting requirements.

“The purpose of this CFE exercise is to show that we can host a CFE inspection with short-notice,” said Mike Mench, United States Armed Forces in Europe regional treaty compliance officer. “The minimum amount of time required for notification of the inspection is 43 hours prior to that inspection. This is why it is imperative that our base stays ready for anything because something like this is very important and can touch the entire base.”

During the CFE inspection, the inspection team is authorized to search any facility with an entryway of two meters in width or more, and any container two meters or more along all dimensions, regardless of ownership or purpose, to check for all equipment subject to the treaty. All units on the installation must be prepared to provide this access while protecting operation security concerns.

“One of the most important things during this exercise is remembering compliance without compromise,” said Mench. “This means making sure we provide all of the access that is necessary, but nothing more.”

OPSEC remains a top priority while providing access to the installation for inspection.

The inspection included an exercise inspection team, accompanied by Defense Threat Reduction Agency and 52nd Fighter Wing escorts. Facilities were able to be inspected more than once throughout the day therefore all personnel were required to maintain awareness of the events taking place to ensure the installation met its primary objective of demonstrating “compliance without compromise."