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Joachim Rodenkirch, left, mayor of Wittlich, helps a local German woman through a window at city hall during a Fasching celebration in Wittlich, Germany, Feb. 23, 2017. Once the ladies have “taken over” the city hall, the celebrations begin with dancing and parading throughout the city. The traditional Fasching celebrations begin the Thursday prior to Lent at the 11th minute past the 11th hour, continue until Ash Wednesday and allow people to indulge before the Lent season. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jonathan Snyder)
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Attendees enjoy the festivities during a Fasching celebration in Wittlich, Germany, Feb. 23, 2017. More than 250 citizens attended the celebration inside the city's main square. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jonathan Snyder)
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Col. Steven Zubowicz, 52nd Mission Support Group commander, throws candy to the crowd below city hall during a Fasching celebration in Wittlich, Germany, Feb. 23, 2017. The celebration included a tradition of female citizens storming the city hall to seize control of the community for the day. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jonathan Snyder)
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A delegation of Fasching revelers lead a crowd in a chant during a Fasching celebration in Wittlich, Germany, Feb. 23, 2017. More than 250 citizens attended the celebration inside the city's main square. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jonathan Snyder)
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Laura McFall, spouse of the 52nd Fighter Wing commander, climbs the ladder up to city hall during a Fasching celebration in Wittlich, Germany, Feb. 23, 2017. Once the ladies have “taken over” the city hall, the celebrations begin with dancing and parading throughout the city. The traditional Fasching celebrations begin the Thursday prior to Lent at the 11th minute past the 11th hour, continue until Ash Wednesday and allow people to indulge before the Lent season. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jonathan Snyder)
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Heather Horton, spouse of the 52nd Fighter Wing vice commander, climbs the ladder up to city hall during a Fasching celebration in Wittlich, Germany, Feb. 23, 2017. Once the ladies have “taken over” the city hall, the celebrations begin with dancing and parading throughout the city. The traditional Fasching celebrations begin the Thursday prior to Lent at the 11th minute past the 11th hour, continue until Ash Wednesday and allow people to indulge before the Lent season. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jonathan Snyder)
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Children and adults reach for candy thrown out of city hall during a Fasching celebration in Wittlich, Germany, Feb. 23, 2017. The celebration included a tradition of female citizens storming the city hall to seize control of the community for the day. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jonathan Snyder)
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Col. Steven Zubowicz, 52nd Mission Support Group commander, talks with other attendees at city hall during a Fasching celebration in Wittlich, Germany, Feb. 23, 2017. The celebration included a tradition of female citizens storming the city hall to seize control of the community for the day. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jonathan Snyder)
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Col. Steven Zubowicz, left, 52nd Mission Support Group commander, talks with Joachim Rodenkirch, right, mayor of Wittlich, at city hall during a Fasching celebration in Wittlich, Germany, Feb. 23, 2017. The celebration included a tradition of female citizens storming the city hall to seize control of the community for the day. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jonathan Snyder)
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Retired U.S. Air Force Col. Gail Halvorsen, a C-52 Skymaster pilot also known as the Candy Bomber, speaks during a reopening ceremony of the Berlin Airlift Memorial outside Frankfurt International Airport, Germany, Nov. 22, 2016. Halvorsen and his fellow pilots dropped 23 tons of candy with makeshift parachutes from his C-54 as part of the Berlin Airlift, which delivered more than two million tons of food to the blockaded citizens of West Berlin between June 1948 and October 1949. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Joe W. McFadden)
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A German child holds up an umbrella for retired U.S. Air Force Col. Gail Halvorsen, a C-52 Skymaster pilot also known as the Candy Bomber, as he speaks during a reopening ceremony of the Berlin Airlift Memorial outside Frankfurt International Airport, Germany, Nov. 22, 2016. The children sang songs as part of the ceremony which commemorated the airlift which delivered more than two million tons of food to the blockaded citizens of West Berlin between June 1948 and October 1949. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Joe W. McFadden)
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U.S. Air Force Col. Timothy Stretch, U.S. Air Forces Europe representative on behalf of the commander, speaking during the reopening ceremony of the Berlin Airlift Memorial outside Frankfurt International Airport, Germany, Nov. 22, 2016. The ceremony included retired U.S. Air Force Col. Gail Halvorsen, also known as the Candy Bomber, who dropped 23 tons of candy with makeshift parachutes from his C-54 Skymaster as part of the humanitarian supply mission. The Berlin Airlift, also known as Operation Vittles, delivered more than two million tons of food to the blockaded citizens of West Berlin between June 1948 and October 1949. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Joe W. McFadden)
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Retired U.S. Air Force Col. Gail Halvorsen, a C-52 Skymaster pilot also known as the Candy Bomber, center, poses with U.S. Air Forces in Europe Airmen from Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, and Ramstein Air Base, Germany, after the reopening ceremony of the Berlin Airlift Memorial outside Frankfurt International Airport, Germany, Nov. 22, 2016. Most of the Airmen serve with the 726th Air Mobility Squadron, which traces its lineage to Halvorsen's efforts as part of the airlift, which delivered more than two million tons of food to the blockaded citizens of West Berlin between June 1948 and October 1949. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Joe W. McFadden)
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U.S. Air Force Col. Timothy Stretch, U.S. Air Forces Europe representative on behalf of the commander, shakes the hand of retired U.S. Air Force Col. Gail Halvorsen, also known as the Candy Bomber, during the reopening ceremony of the Berlin Airlift Memorial outside Frankfurt International Airport, Germany, Nov. 22, 2016. Halvorsen and his fellow Airmen dropped 23 tons of candy with makeshift parachutes from his C-54 Skymaster as part of the humanitarian supply mission, which delivered more than two million tons of food to the blockaded citizens of West Berlin between June 1948 and October 1949. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Joe W. McFadden)
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A signed picture representing the Berlin Airlift rests on a music stand during the reopening ceremony of the Berlin Airlift Memorial outside Frankfurt International Airport, Germany, Nov. 22, 2016. The ceremony included retired U.S. Air Force Col. Gail Halvorsen, also known as the Candy Bomber, who dropped 23 tons of candy with makeshift parachutes from his C-54 Skymaster as part of the humanitarian supply mission. The Berlin Airlift, also known as Operation Vittles, delivered more than two million tons of food to the blockaded citizens of West Berlin between June 1948 and September 1949. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Joe W. McFadden)
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