A&FRC promotes healthy relationships

Participants of the Healthy Relationships Series interview each other in the 52nd Force Support Squadron Airman and Family Readiness Center at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, Jan. 14, 2015. The interviews were part of the Four Lenses assessment, a course that recognizes each individual's personality traits. The community readiness specialists at the A&FRC offer similar classes once a month designed to strengthen relationships of any kind: between coworkers, supervisors and subordinates, or husband and wife. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Daryl Knee/Released)

Participants of the Healthy Relationships Series interview each other in the 52nd Force Support Squadron Airman and Family Readiness Center at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, Jan. 14, 2015. The interviews were part of the Four Lenses assessment, a course that recognizes each individual's personality traits. The community readiness specialists at the A&FRC offer similar classes once a month designed to strengthen relationships of any kind: between coworkers, supervisors and subordinates, or husband and wife. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Daryl Knee/Released)

Airmen participate in a Four Lenses personality assessment Jan. 14, 2015, in the 52nd Force Support Squadron's Airman and Family Readiness Center at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany. The assessment is one of many classes the A&FRC provide monthly as part of a Healthy Relationship Series, a program designed to improve relationships and foster better interpersonal communication skills. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Daryl Knee/Released)

Airmen participate in a Four Lenses personality assessment Jan. 14, 2015, in the 52nd Force Support Squadron's Airman and Family Readiness Center at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany. The assessment is one of many classes the A&FRC provide monthly as part of a Healthy Relationship Series, a program designed to improve relationships and foster better interpersonal communication skills. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Daryl Knee/Released)

An Airman participates in a Four Lenses personality assessment Jan. 14, 2015, in the 52nd Force Support Squadron's Airman and Family Readiness Center at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany. During this assessment, the participants had to review different photographs and phrases that best describe their personality. Then, the participants were separated into four colors — blue for people who value relationships; green for competency; orange for freedom; and gold structure. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Daryl Knee/Released)

An Airman participates in a Four Lenses personality assessment Jan. 14, 2015, in the 52nd Force Support Squadron's Airman and Family Readiness Center at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany. During this assessment, the participants had to review different photographs and phrases that best describe their personality. Then, the participants were separated into four colors — blue for people who value relationships; green for competency; orange for freedom; and gold structure. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Daryl Knee/Released)

An Airman delivers a presentation during the Four Lenses assessment Jan. 14, 2015, in the 52nd Force Support Squadron's Airman and Family Readiness Center at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany. The instructors separated the class into groups who then created a list of values, strengths, needs and joys of their personality types. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Daryl Knee/Released)

An Airman delivers a presentation during the Four Lenses assessment Jan. 14, 2015, in the 52nd Force Support Squadron's Airman and Family Readiness Center at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany. The instructors separated the class into groups who then created a list of values, strengths, needs and joys of their personality types. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Daryl Knee/Released)

Four photo pages rest on a table during the Four Lenses assessment Jan. 14, 2015, in the 52nd Force Support Squadron's Airman and Family Readiness Center at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany. Each photo page displayed images designed to predict personality traits of the assessment participants. The participants would look at the images and select a color, which then identified the person's strongest value - freedom, structure, competency or relationships. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Daryl Knee/Released)

Four photo pages rest on a table during the Four Lenses assessment Jan. 14, 2015, in the 52nd Force Support Squadron's Airman and Family Readiness Center at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany. Each photo page displayed images designed to predict personality traits of the assessment participants. The participants would look at the images and select a color, which then identified the person's strongest value - freedom, structure, competency or relationships. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Daryl Knee/Released)

SPANGDAHLEM AIR BASE, Germany -- The 52nd Force Support Squadron's Airman & Family Readiness Center offers classes the second Wednesday of every month as part of a healthy relationship series.

The series tackles communication issues that many people face either in the workcenter or at home. The classes change each month to cover every aspect of relationships: leader and subordinate; parent and child; single Airmen; boyfriend and girlfriend; married couples.

The most recent class, Jan. 14, 2015, featured the Four Lenses, an assessment which aims to identify common personality traits of each participant. Depending on the participant's answers, he or she is separated into one of four groups: blue for people who value relationships, green for people who value competency, gold for structure, and orange for freedom.

"There is always going to be conflict in the workplace," said Annalisa Horan, a 52nd FSS personal work life specialist and co-leader of the class. "The intent of this series is to build on each others' strengths rather than highlight the negatives. We want people to see personality differences as opportunities, not annoyances, and see how the personality types augment each other."

Horan said the Four Lenses assessment is beneficial to military members -- especially between leaders and subordinates -- because identifying personality traits helps facilitate effective communication. For example, if a flight chief relates more to a specific color, an Airman can prepare better before approaching a conflict. Alternatively, supervisors can gauge what personality traits their Airmen possess to more effectively mentor or coach them through any of life's hardships.

"Our classes relate to resiliency," said Allisa Shepard, a 52nd FSS community readiness specialist. "(U.S. Air Forces in Europe and Air Forces Africa's) RUFit model talks about the pillars of wellness: mental, physical, social and mental. So, part of being fit is having good working personal and professional relationships."

The more people know about themselves and others, Horan added, the more skilled they will become in maintaining healthy relationships or accomplishing their job.

"I hear a lot of people say, 'My leader doesn't like me,' when, in fact, they are just polar opposite personalities," Horan said. "Again, these classes we offer are designed to recognize and appreciate people's differences."

Recognizing and celebrating diversity fits into the military culture of teambuilding, Shepard said. Building stronger relationships requires open minds and the ability to unify as one force.

The classes are open to anyone wishing to attend, but class sizes are limited. Anyone wishing to reserve a spot should visit the A&FRC, or call DSN 452-6244 or 06565-61-6244. Also, the center is available through Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/52DFSSAFRC.

"We're always here to offer training now to make sure no problems arise in the future," Shepard said. "If you get out ahead of communication problems, it's easier to mitigate any damage."