EET members observe, provide feedback during Phase II

Two Airmen “detain” and provide self-aid buddy care for a role player during the Phase II exercise. Read more about the Phase II and the exercise evaluation team’s role in. (US Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kristin Ruleau)

Two Airmen “detain” and provide self-aid buddy care for a role player during the Phase II exercise. Read more about the Phase II and the exercise evaluation team’s role in. (US Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kristin Ruleau)

SPANGDAHLEM AIR BASE, GERMANY -- The phase II portion of exercise Operation Saber Crown kicked off here Feb. 12. The Exercise Evaluation Team was on-hand to evaluate the performances of wing personnel throughout the base.

Members of the 52nd Logistics Readiness Squadron thought it was just another Monday morning, but that all changed when someone noticed smoke coming in from under the entrance door.

As the smoke built, Capt. Melissa Jordan, 52nd LRS Logistics Readiness Center director, ensured 12 people were evacuated safely, after securing all classified material in the work area. Several EET members were in the room, watching how everyone in the LRC responded to the crisis.

"Our role as EET is to observe them, make sure they're doing what they're supposed to do and following the procedures," said Master Sgt. William Elliott, 52nd LRS EET member. "We give a briefing, or feedback, so the next time this happens they can improve their response time."

Each EET member is an expert in their particular field. They watch the various training scenarios to ensure proper procedures are followed.

As Captain Jordan mustered her Airmen outside, she assessed if any of the LRC personnel need first-aid, while Maj. Kip Koehler, 52nd Medical Group EET member, paid close attention to her actions.

"Primarily, this is to teach each individual how to administer self-aid buddy care," Major Koehler said. "(The training) puts into practice what they have learned through classes."

After the exercise was over, Captain Jordan talked with many of the EET members to get immediate feedback on how her Airmen performed.
"If we wait until the end, then a lot of it's lost," the captain said. "I think being out there giving us on-the-spot feedback right after a scenario has occurred is probably the most valuable."

Capt. Tiffany Fisher, 52nd Fighter Wing Plans, Programs and Inspections deputy, said giving exercise results to the scenario players is an important function of the EET, and it helps people learn the most in the shortest amount of time.

"You always respond better to immediate feedback rather than getting that feedback a week or two after," Captain Fisher said. "EET will speak with the individuals, you did this well, you need to fix this, don't do this next time."

Once the Airmen discuss what they did, both right and wrong, the exercise scenario is over for them, but not for the EET.

"After the exercise (has ended), they take all of their findings and compile it into a report," Captain Fisher said. "We compile that report so the wing leadership can use it to make changes in the future, so that future exercises can be better."