Fabrication flight provides needed parts

SPANGDAHLEM AIR BASE, Germany -- Airman 1st Class Justin Badord, 52nd Equipment Maintenance Squadron, fabricates an accumulator bracket out of sheet metal Jan. 21 in the aircraft structural maintenance shop. The ASM shop removes corrosion applies preventative procedures and ensures aircraft are structurally sound.  In the Air Force, 90 percent of all aircraft repairs must be hand-fabricated because the Air Force no longer makes the parts needed for repairs. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Nick Wilson)

SPANGDAHLEM AIR BASE, Germany -- Airman 1st Class Justin Badord, 52nd Equipment Maintenance Squadron, fabricates an accumulator bracket out of sheet metal Jan. 21 in the aircraft structural maintenance shop. The ASM shop removes corrosion applies preventative procedures and ensures aircraft are structurally sound. In the Air Force, 90 percent of all aircraft repairs must be hand-fabricated because the Air Force no longer makes the parts needed for repairs. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Nick Wilson)

SPANGDAHLEM AIR BASE, Germany -- Airman 1st Class Justin Badord, 52nd Equipment Maintenance Squadron, fabricates an accumulator bracket out of sheet metal Jan. 21 in the aircraft structural maintenance shop. The ASM shop removes corrosion applies preventative procedures and ensures aircraft are structurally sound.  In the Air Force, 90 percent of all aircraft repairs must be hand-fabricated because the Air Force no longer makes the parts needed for repairs. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Nick Wilson)

SPANGDAHLEM AIR BASE, Germany -- Airman 1st Class Justin Badord, 52nd Equipment Maintenance Squadron, fabricates an accumulator bracket out of sheet metal Jan. 21 in the aircraft structural maintenance shop. The ASM shop removes corrosion applies preventative procedures and ensures aircraft are structurally sound. In the Air Force, 90 percent of all aircraft repairs must be hand-fabricated because the Air Force no longer makes the parts needed for repairs. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Nick Wilson)

SPANGDAHLEM AIR BASE, Germany -- Senior Airman Ray Vinton, 52nd Equipment Maintenance Squadron, applies sealant compound to a gun access door for an A-10 Thunderbolt II Jan. 21 in the aircraft structural maintenance shop. The sealant compound keeps water from getting between the metal and corroding layers of an aircraft's structure. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Nick Wilson)

SPANGDAHLEM AIR BASE, Germany -- Senior Airman Ray Vinton, 52nd Equipment Maintenance Squadron, applies sealant compound to a gun access door for an A-10 Thunderbolt II Jan. 21 in the aircraft structural maintenance shop. The sealant compound keeps water from getting between the metal and corroding layers of an aircraft's structure. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Nick Wilson)

SPANGDAHLEM AIR BASE, Germany -- Senior Airman Ray Vinton, 52nd Equipment Maintenance Squadron, applies sealant compound to a gun access door for an A-10 Thunderbolt II Jan. 21 in the aircraft structural maintenance shop. The sealant compound keeps water from getting between the metal and corroding layers of an aircraft's structure. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Nick Wilson)

SPANGDAHLEM AIR BASE, Germany -- Senior Airman Ray Vinton, 52nd Equipment Maintenance Squadron, applies sealant compound to a gun access door for an A-10 Thunderbolt II Jan. 21 in the aircraft structural maintenance shop. The sealant compound keeps water from getting between the metal and corroding layers of an aircraft's structure. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Nick Wilson)

SPANGDAHLEM AIR BASE, Germany -- Senior Airman James Hurst, 52nd Equipment Maintenance Squadron, cuts metal with an oxyacetylene rig Jan. 22 in the metals technology welding room. This process is necessary to cut metal to a size small enough for disposal. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Nick Wilson)

SPANGDAHLEM AIR BASE, Germany -- Senior Airman James Hurst, 52nd Equipment Maintenance Squadron, cuts metal with an oxyacetylene rig Jan. 22 in the metals technology welding room. This process is necessary to cut metal to a size small enough for disposal. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Nick Wilson)

SPANGDAHLEM AIR BASE, Germany -- Senior Airman James Hurst, 52nd Equipment Maintenance Squadron, cuts metal with an oxyacetylene rig Jan. 22 in the metals technology welding room. This process is necessary to cut metal to a size small enough for disposal. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Nick Wilson)

SPANGDAHLEM AIR BASE, Germany -- Senior Airman James Hurst, 52nd Equipment Maintenance Squadron, cuts metal with an oxyacetylene rig Jan. 22 in the metals technology welding room. This process is necessary to cut metal to a size small enough for disposal. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Nick Wilson)

SPANGDAHLEM AIR BASE, Germany -- Airman 1st Class Abigail Dressler, 52nd Equipment Maintenance Squadron, uses metal inert gas to weld a piece of equipment Jan. 22 in the metals technology welding room. This is done to fabricate aircraft support equipment such as stands for aircraft maintenance, power units and air conditioning units. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Nick Wilson)

SPANGDAHLEM AIR BASE, Germany -- Airman 1st Class Abigail Dressler, 52nd Equipment Maintenance Squadron, uses metal inert gas to weld a piece of equipment Jan. 22 in the metals technology welding room. This is done to fabricate aircraft support equipment such as stands for aircraft maintenance, power units and air conditioning units. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Nick Wilson)